A Colorful approach

I'm trying out a new-to-me palette of colors. It's a secondary palette, and the 6 main colors mix to create pure secondaries, unlike the primary palette, which creates a more subdued set of combinations. Here's a look at the latest color wheel and the first painting using the new palette. The neutral colors are most certainly the challenge here, I'll need to improve my control of the pigments, but I'm looking forward to the dance! wpid2667-DSC_9974.jpg   watercolor on 100% cotton paper   watercolor on 100% cotton paper

Feel free to rise

We are so held up by our fears, concerns and personal challenges that sometimes we forget to fly. Sometimes we can fly, but we need some space for take off. Sometimes we can fly, but the water of our life is holding us back. Maybe we've gotten in too deep. Life is that water that feeds us, and yet also drags us back sometimes. If we gaze upward and don't lose sight of what we can be, then we will ascend. Ascension 8x10 oil on canvas

A Surprisingly nice yellow

It's been rainy all weekend, so I decided to do some research into various color palettes. Handprint.com is a marvelous website for watercolor information. I found it very interesting that the author, Bruce MacEvoy likes PY150, which is a nickel Azo. Winsor & Newton label it as Transparent Yellow, series 1A. Be advised that they also have a Transparent Yellow, PY97 (Arylamide) which is a series 2. That means it's a bit more expensive, about $4. The colors on first glance aren't even similar, the series 1A yellow looks like yellow ochre in the tube, while the series 2 yellow is clear and bright. I consider myself a power-user of transparent yellow, and had considered the series 1A a mistake until yesterday. This yellow is rich, and when blended out with water it becomes bright and transparent. It lifts out almost to the white of the paper and makes a wonderful orange when mixed with Cadmium Red PR108. Here's a little sparrow I painted using PY150. watercolor on 100% cotton paper

Mustangs and Dreams

Sometimes making art isn't difficult. The painting arrives unbidden, and quietly places itself upon the canvas. Oh sure, there's the little nit-bits that require tweaking and twiddling, but for the most part, the portrait sings itself into being. This painting was like that. It started as an abstracted landscape. Didn't like that, so what kind of living creature might I find here? And there he is. I've titled this Mustang Dreams, because I think they do dream. They dream of no mountain lions, no freezing rain and snow, and they dream of fresh, sweet hay. Mustang Dreams 20x24 acrylic on canvas; $400 You may also purchase reproductions here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/KittieRueHandmade